You can’t steer a still ship

If you want to steer a ship, get it moving. Water passing over the rudder is what makes it maneuver. This is a quote that I want my boys to grasp, and it is one many need to. The concept is you need to get moving, you can always change course later. Pick. Dream. Pursue. And, let God work in you as He gets you to the destination.

Military. Job. College.
My dad gave me those three options when I started 7th grade. They were a huge motivation to do well in school. The last part of the statement went: “But either way, you’re out of the house.” Dad spoke the message clearly. Man up. I picked a direction quickly and pursued it. A key element imparted to me was variety. Broad experiences help clarifies when one pursues a direction. Direction may change from experience. It is hard to change course when you’re not moving.

“Kids don’t dream today…”
The statement surprised me in a conversing with a well seasoned pastor. It made sense. In my high school, many worried over what they were to do. Graduation became somber as much as celebration. I cannot fathom people not dreaming, of not having direction. Partly because I’m wired that way. Partly because time doesn’t stop for limbo. Dreaming is not a passive exercise.

Eat. Pray. Love (Lament).
I can see where the elements of this book & movie resonate with America. Americans do not know how to simply enjoy life. The pace of life also pours into spiritual confusion. Then, with the non stop spiritually confused state, one loses their love life. Love needs a focus other than one’s self. Kelly and I discussed this at length. As we understand it thus far, Eastern Philosophies focus on balance has two key themes: emptying (meditation) and waiting (letting things show themselves). In contrast, Christian thought is filling (God is the God who fills things) and pursuing (Pursuing God is part of waiting on Him) and answers come. This pursuit includes a sabbath principle whereby God want us to simply rest to remember.

Values over Vision; Journey over Destination
Americans love big things. We love vision. We love destinations. In this quest, our blinders go up to values and journey. How often in our literature, art, dramas, and talks do we realize this anew? In “Built to Last” Jim Collins realizes that great companies focus intently on their values more than anything. They focus on being more than doing; the key to their successed. Our thought process is best summed up by Han Solo’s statement: “I prefer a straight fight to all this sneakin’ around.” Dave Ramsey’s one piece of advice he’d give to young leaders: “Let problems work themselves out.” Our pragmatic, driven, competitive side should remember that life seldom takes the direct route.

Visions in the Bible are like cars with really bad turbo lag. Some, like Abraham or Joseph, only get a mere whisper of the vision being fulfilled and it is left to others to do it. The pattern goes like this: God gives a vision…………………………………………and then it happens. Often the trouble comes when one tries to force its accomplishment vs pursuing God in the midst of the wait. The lack of peace in the Middle East is a clear example of this. Focus on being vs doing allows you to pursue without rushing. The Bible focuses more on becoming verse doing. The fulfillment and accomplishment of our vision or destination is already secured by God.

The bottom line:
You can’t steer a still ship. Pick a direction and then let God guide your journey. Your vision may be clarified later, it may not be. You might start with one, and you might not. But, know this: time does not stand still. While anchored in indecision, you will lose lessons of what God wants you to become. If you are too set on your destination, you may run aground getting there, and lose what God wants you to become. Pick a direction and learn to navigate. Work with the currents, the weather, the sun and stars. Clarity and discovery comes to those who pursue over those who wait. Pick. Dream. Pursue. And, let God work in you as He gets you to the destination.

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